February 9, 2006

WISCONSIN: American Lung Assoc. - E85 Less Harmful than Gas

The health benefits of moving from our dependence on fossil fuel to widespread adoption of E85 (85% ethanol blend) are significant in the opinion of the American Lung Association. Its Wisconsin organization is publicizing its support of broader legislative support for E85 and has created a website called “Clean Air Choice.” to build public awareness of the issues involved.

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E85 is cleaner, home-grown answer to decreasing dependence on Mideast oil



Brookfield, WI (February 7, 2006) -- The American Lung Association of Wisconsin (ALA/W) has recognized E85 for flexible fuel vehicles as a “Clean Air Choice.” The ALA-WI supports the use of E85 because of its ability to reduce tailpipe and greenhouse gas emissions. E85 has the highest oxygen content of any transportation fuel available today, allowing it to burn cleaner than typical gasoline blends. Fewer exhaust emissions result in reduced smog formation and risk from respiratory illnesses like asthma and COPD.

E85 also reduces greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide, the main contributor to global warming, by 30 percent or more. E85 is designed for use in flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). FFVs may use any blend of gasoline and/or E85 interchangeably. Not every vehicle is a FFV; however, literally tens of thousands of FFVs are on Wisconsin roads and highways today.

All three major U.S. auto manufacturers as well as Isuzu, Mazda, Mercedes, Mercury and Nissan offer several FFV models. Most FFV owners remain unaware that they may use anything except gasoline. All FFVs carry a small decal underneath the fuel door that indicates the use of E85 and/or gasoline.

FFVs do not cost more than gasoline-only models, unlike today’s hybrid-electric models. And, 100-plus octane E85 is cost-competitive. On a per mile basis, E85 is typically priced similar to 87-octane gasoline. When gasoline spiked to over $3.00 per gallon last year, E85 remained substantially lower.

Currently, 23 Wisconsin outlets sell E85, which is nearly double the number of stations compared with this time last year. ALA/W is working to build awareness of the benefits of E85 among consumers, service station owners and car dealerships to increase FFV ownership and E85 availability. The Lung Association hopes to assist local partners in doubling the number of
fueling stations in 2006, and the organization supports AB 809, a bill introduced by Representative Mike Sheridan that offers tax credits to consumers who purchasing FFVs.

“If you own an E85 FFV, the Lung Association urges you to heed the President’s call to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil,” stated Dona Wininsky, ALA/W Director of Public Policy and Communications. “Placing a ribbon on your car displays your patriotism, but make certain you have cleaner, home-grown, E85 in your tank.”

For more information on Wisconsin E85 fueling outlets and FFVs, visit www.CleanAirChoice.org or www.e85fuel.com.

4 comments:

American Lung Association of Minnesota said...

The American Lung Association of Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois als support E85 and biodiesel fuel!

C. Scott Miller, EDP said...

Good to know, ALA/M. Thanks!

Is there any possibility that the American Lung Association will establish a national policy in support of E85 and biodiesel fuel for health reasons? I think it would be particularly helpful in the "blue states" where health issues are engender alot of activism whereas ethanol is seen as a "red state" boondoggle.

American Lung Association of Minnesota said...

It's possible. Right now, our national position does not mention E85 specifically, but does strongly support "...cleaner fuels, including reformulated gasoline and alternative fuels..."

FYI: Wisconsin, Illinois and Minnesota were "blue states" in 2004. They are also the states with the highest number of E85 pumps anywhere in the nation.

julie said...

I think everyone should support E85 and biodiesel fuel as E85 has the ability to help reduce carbon emissions and makes it less harmful to the environment.
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julie

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